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The Play That Saved Josh Allen’s Career (Football Injuries Uncovered: Vol. 5)

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Let’s travel back to September 20th, 2020. Social unrest, COVID, and the presidential elections dominated the national headlines. Meanwhile, the Bills were 1-0 and down at South Beach. After a fast start, the Bills lost their lead in that game at the start of the fourth quarter. Fitzy was dialing it up, and it had all the fixings for a collapse. Then, on the first play of the ensuing Bills series (10 minutes left in regulation), Josh Allen pulls off a little hop throw that changed the world. The ramifications were insurmountable as the 47-yard pass to Diggs eventually lead to the game-sealing score. A momentous tide shift against a divisional foe. Is this what catapulted the season? Let’s put it this way, on this play, Josh Allen saved his centerfold legs.

Image courtesy of Buffalo Bills Twitter/@BuffaloBills.

Hop throws ain’t easy. What makes a little hop throw so beautiful in this situation is that Josh Allen prevented a catastrophic injury. With a massive lineman barreling down at his knees, Josh had the elite awareness and the physical grace to make this a historic play in Bills lore. Imagine if he tore his ACL there? I mean he could have just sprained an ankle I guess, but he also almost suffered a compound fracture in his leg like Alex Smith. If you didn’t know, now you know. Here, let’s look at how he pulled off the most magic in Buffalo since Doug Flutie.

Image courtesy of The Checkdown.

The extravaganza of this play goes beyond the brawn of a man who looks stellar in shorts. That would be stating the obvious. Josh Allen displays everything you’re looking for below the waist of an athlete that can be sprightly in the pocket. What you cannot fathom, Josh’s little X-factor is his cerebral fortitude.

A Beautiful Mind

Diagram courtesy of neurones.co.uk.

Adam Sandler didn’t want to talk about the Medulla Oblongata in 1998. What The Waterboy should have been discussing was the Posterior Parietal Cortex. While all of Josh’s brain lobes were firing on this fateful play, none were more important than the PPC. This area of the brain is responsible for spatial awareness and decision-making. It could have just been divine intervention, but what most scouts actually missed when studying Josh Allen was the aptitude of his neural circuits that pave the way to elite sensory decision making. Josh sensed the danger (pressure), so he tapped into his special genetics. The resulting hop sparred injury and lead to franchise-altering results.

Josh Allen Slays Shorts & Saves Careers

The main muscle groups of looking good in shorts were on full display in this parade of athletic prowess. All things considered, his arm talent is evident. It is real… and it’s spectacular. Nevertheless, prior to launch, a sequence occurred. The three muscle groups that fire on that little hop throw, are the same muscles that are on display in shorts: the calves, thighs, and glutes. In conclusion, looking good in shorts saved Josh Allen’s career and our franchise.

What Could’ve Happened

Image courtesy of SI.com

To understand the magnitude of this play, one need not look further than September 7, 2008. Exactly 10 years B.J. (Before Josh), a villain sustained one of the biggest obstacles of his career. Tom Brady took a hit on his knee that left him with a torn ACL. It’d be hard to argue against the mental capability that lies within Tom Brady’s ears, but it’s clear Tom can’t do the hop throw like Josh. Don’t @ me.

In all seriousness, while Brady came back from that catastrophic injury, not everyone is as fortunate. If Josh Allen failed to properly execute that hop, his career and the potential Buffalo Bills dynasty would have likely ended before it began.