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Future Buffalo Bills Wall of Famers: “The Drought” Era

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The Buffalo Bills Wall of Fame is studded with players such as Billy Shaw, Jack Kemp, Joe Ferguson, and all those big names you know and love. From O.J. Simpson’s 1980 induction to Cookie Gilchrist’s in 2017, a total of 31 names have been honored on our stadium’s walls. But, after over 60 years of Buffalo Bills history, there’s still a lot of legends left out in the cold. How do you determine what is and isn’t the kind of greatness you’d like emblazoned on your stadium for all time? More importantly, who’s next?

In this short article series, we’ll discuss almost every player who has a case for the Wall of Fame from all three eras of Buffalo Bills football. (Retired players only, so sorry Jerry Hughes.) Let’s start with ‘The Drought”.

Eric Wood (2009-2018)

This 2009 first-round pick of the Bills is a fan-favorite. If you like Buffalo, you know who Eric Wood is and what he brought to this team during his tenure. After beginning his rookie season at right guard, Wood quickly moved back to his natural position of center, locking down the starting job with apparent ease.Wood demonstrated excellence both on and off the field, earning a Pro Bowl appearance and Walter Payton Man of the Year nomination in 2015. After a long series of injuries to close his career, Eric was forced to retire from the game after the 2017 season. Wood started every single one of his 120 games over nine seasons as a Bill. He continues to be a fixture for the Bills on gameday, providing color commentary for the Buffalo Bills Radio Network; a role he’s held since 2019.

Kyle Williams (2006-2018)

If there was ever a shoe-in for a Wall of Fame spot, it’s Kyle Williams. Kyle, a fifth-round pick back in 2006, became the heart and soul of the team. He elevated the play of those around him, bringing unsurpassable leadership to a team that sorely needed it. Over his 13-year career (all with Buffalo), Williams played in a whopping 183 games, good for seventh-most of any player in team history and second-most among defensive linemen. The six-time Pro Bowler and three-time All-Pro (one Second-Team, two First-Team) also wreaked havoc in backfields around the league. When ‘The Drought” ended, it was Kyle Williams who carried the torch. And, on his back, we returned to the playoffs for the first time in 18 years.

Fred Jackson (2006-2014)

The definition of a late bloomer, Freddie didn’t come to the NFL right away. Named to four All-American teams in 2002, Jackson was considered too small at 6’1″ and 195 lbs. to compete in the NFL, going undrafted in 2003. He played indoor football and hopped over the ocean to NFL Europe before getting invited to Bills camp by fellow Coe College alum and then-GM Marv Levy.

The legend began right there. Jackson would play nine seasons in Buffalo, ranking third in rushing yards (5,646) and fourth in rush TDs (30) in franchise history. He also sits fifth all-time in yards from scrimmage with 8,286, and holds a whopping 78.2 yard per game average. The only two RBs to rank higher are Thurman Thomas and O.J. Simpson. In 2009, he became the first player in NFL history to amass 1,000 yards as a rusher and return man in a single season. (His jersey from that seasons is on display in Canton.) In 2010, he was a Walter Payton Man of the Year nominee.

Lee Evans (2004-2011)

At the time of his retirement, Andre Reed’s #83 was put aside out of respect for the legend. In 2004, Lee Evans was given special permission to borrow it for a while. The first-round pick wore it for eight seasons in Buffalo. In spite of relatively poor QB play, Evans managed to put up 377 receptions, 5,934 receiving yards, and 43 receiving TDs in his Bills career; good for fourth, third, and third in team history, respectively. Evans still holds the team record for single-game receiving yards (265 vs. Houston Texans during 2006).

Rian Lindell (2003-2013)

As far as kickers go, Rian Lindell is one of the greats. He joined the Bills as a Free Agent in 2003. In his 11-year stint as a Bill, Ryan put 225 field goals through the uprights and scored a total of 980 points, both of which are good for second all-time for Buffalo. He’s the only Bill in team history to have three five-field goal games.

Hansel on Twitter: “Of Kickers with 165+ XP Attempts, Rian Lindell ranks #1 in @NFL history in XP%.His XP% of 99.769% (432/433) will likely never be surpassed with the XP since moved back. / Twitter”

Of Kickers with 165+ XP Attempts, Rian Lindell ranks #1 in @NFL history in XP%.His XP% of 99.769% (432/433) will likely never be surpassed with the XP since moved back.

Terrence McGee (2003-2012)

McGee was a dual-threat, terrorizing offenses as a defensive back and demolishing special teams units with his return ability. The former Bills fourth-round pick would become a Pro Bowl return specialist in 2004, his three kick-return TD season. In 2005, he became the first NFL player to score a kick return TD and a pick-six in the same game; that also capped off his second straight All-Pro year. McGee ended his injury-plagued career as the Bills all-time leader in kick return TDs (5), return attempts (207), and return yards (5,450). He played an impressive 122 games, started 90 of them at cornerback. (He hauled in 17 interceptions.)

Brian Moorman (2001-2013)

Brian Moorman, another one of the greatest special teams free agent signings of all-time, was arguably the best punter we ever had. Brought to Buffalo in 2001, Moorman would go on to secure the team records for punts (923), punts inside the 20 (259), and gross yards per punt average (43.7 yards). Moorman was a two-time First-Team All-Pro and Pro Bowler in 2005 and 2006. He earned a spot in the NFL’s All-Decade Team for the 2000s, the only player to make that team without a playoff appearance. Moorman also has the longest (84 yards in 2002) and second-longest (80 yards in 2004) punts in Bills history. Prior to his retirement, Moorman was briefly was cut from the Bills in 2012, before bring brought back in 2013.

Aaron Schobel (2001-2009)

This second-round pick in 2001 would go on to be a great one, spending his entire career in Buffalo. Schobel was a force coming off the edge, making two Pro Bowls (2006, 2007) and earning a Second-Team All-Pro nod (2006). While Bruce Smith is the best DE to ever play in Buffalo, Schobel sits second to him with a whopping 78 sacks. Aaron racked up 483 tackles, 21 fumbles, three INTs and eight fumble recoveries before his eventual retirement ahead of the 2010 season.

Eric Moulds (1996-2005)

Moulds, Buffalo’s 1996 first-round pick, didn’t make an immediate impact, having sat behind the great Andre Reed and Quinn Early. But, in 1998, Moulds made magic happen; He set the Bills single-season receiving record with 1,368 yards; a record that would stand until Stefon Diggs surpassed it in 2020. A three-time Pro Bowl selection (1998, 2000, 2002), he would wind up on the Bills All-Time Team. Similar to the beginning of his career, Moulds would end his Bills tenure just behind Reed, ranking second in team history for total receptions (675), receiving yards (9,096) and touchdowns (48). Moulds still owns two of the top three single-season receiving yards totals in team history (for now).

Honorable Mentions:

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